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If you recently attended a Utah Jazz game, are you at risk for coronavirus?

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New York Knicks guard RJ Barrett (9) dribbles the ball as Utah Jazz center Rudy Gobert defends during the first half of an NBA basketball game in New York, Wednesday, March 4, 2020. (AP Photo/Sarah Stier)

Utah Jazz stars Rudy Gobert and Donovan Mitchell tested positive for coronavirus on Wednesday, leaving many people with questions about how he got it and how far it has spread.

The Utah Department of Health says fans in attendance of the March 9 home game against the Toronto Raptors should only worry for two reasons: if they came in close contact with players, or if they've developed symptoms.

According to the department, close contact is being within six feet of someone infected with coronavirus for an extended period of time.

UDOH released a series of questions and answers to help you determine if you may have been exposed to the virus:

RELATED: Can you get coronavirus more than once? That question, others answered

I was at the Utah Jazz v. Toronto Raptors game at the Vivint Smart Home Arena on Monday, March 9. Am I at risk for contracting novel coronavirus?

No, you are at a low risk of developing symptoms from COVID-19 by simply attending the Utah Jazz game on March 9.

Who would be at risk from attending the game or interacting with a Utah Jazz player?

Only individuals who have had close contact with the player who is confirmed to have COVID-19 are considered to be at risk for potentially developing symptoms of COVID-19. In this case, close contact is defined as being within 6 feet of the player who has COVID-19 for an extended period of time, typically for 15 minutes or longer.

If I did have close contact with the player confirmed to have COVID-19, what should I do?

You should stay at home under isolation for the next 14 days from March 9 and be actively monitored by public health. Home isolation means not going to work, school, religious services, or any place where there are large numbers of people and limiting visitors in your home. Active monitoring means you will check your health and report if you had any symptoms at least once a day.

During your isolation, you should watch for symptoms of COVID-19 including fever, cough, and difficulty breathing. If you develop any of these symptoms, even if mild, you should call your healthcare provider BEFORE seeking care at a clinic, hospital, or urgent care facility. Tell your healthcare provider about your potential exposure to a confirmed COVID-19 case and what your symptoms are. Your healthcare provider will give you further instructions on what you need to do to manage your symptoms and if you need to come to a facility for testing.

If I high-fived the player or caught a jersey or other item of personal clothing from the player, am I at risk?

No. These types of contacts are not considered to be close personal contact with the player who has COVID-19.

Could coronavirus have spread from the player, through the crowd, during the game?

No. COVID-19 spreads through close contact. Of course, if you develop symptoms that match novel coronavirus (fever, cough, shortness of breath), you should contact your healthcare provider via phone call or telehealth, and you should stay home from work, school, and all public spaces until you are symptom free.

What should I do if I was at the game and have symptoms of COVID-19?

The symptoms of novel coronavirus include fever, cough, and difficulty breathing. For now, you only need to seek medical care if you have had close contact with a confirmed case AND are symptomatic.

You should also know how to seek out care responsibly. If you meet these criteria, you should call ahead to your doctor’s office or the emergency department to let them know you’re coming. Let them know of your exposure to a confirmed case, and let them know what your symptoms are.

If medical professionals determine you need their care, they will develop a plan for your arrival that ensures everyone’s safety. And if they determine you don’t require their care, you will have ensured these professionals have the time and capacity to care for someone who does.

Call your health provider, or make a telehealth appointment. Do not arrive at a doctor’s office or clinic of any kind without calling ahead first.

Should people who were on the floor of the March 9 Jazz game, or who had personal contact with Jazz players self isolate?

The most important thing to do will be to monitor for symptoms. Only individuals who have had close contact with the player who is confirmed to have COVID-19 are considered to be at risk for potentially developing symptoms of COVID-19. In this case, close contact is defined as being within 6 feet of the player who has COVID-19 for an extended period of time, typically for 15 minutes or longer.

Do you have enough tests to screen Utahns who may have been infected as a result of exposure at this game?

Considering the limited interaction between the infected player and those in attendance at the game on March 9, we believe there will be enough lab capacity to meet the testing demand associated with this event.